Monica Brinkman California dreams of Once Upon a Time

Ahhhh! Moi-nica Brinkman!  A woman after my own heart!  When she is not forest-nymphing behind those Foster Grants you can find her here: http://www.itmattersradio.com/  Literati!   A scant three weeks remains for you to enter our contest Once Upon a Time and a chance to win $250 first prize. And remember that the five semifinalists …

Ahhhh! Moi-nica Brinkman!  A woman after my own heart!  When she is not forest-nymphing behind those Foster Grants you can find her here: http://www.itmattersradio.com/ 

Literati!  

A scant three weeks remains for you to enter our contest Once Upon a Time and a chance to win $250 first prize. And remember that the five semifinalists will each get a gift certificate to the bookstore of their choice. Details on how to enter, win stuff, become famous and suddenly handsome/beautiful and irresistible to the gender or species of your choice can be found here: http://www.awordwithyoupress.com/2014/03/20/once-upon-a-time-our-new-contest/

The whole idea behind the contest is to coerce you into making good on your threat, whispered as pillow talk or casually conversationalated at the the water cooler at work, that you will write a novel.  If you submit a prologue, then none can say it is an idle threat; you have actually begun!

Monica Brinkman, hostess of It Matters Radio and friend of A Word with You Press, has made good on the threat.

Here is the prologue to

Acceptance

by Monica Brinkman

 

Part I

Acceptance

From the start of time, they questioned all…

the reason for life’s’ prodigal

Each side speaking their own truths

configured to gain fortitude

among the mass of peers

 ‘It is what it is’ mystifies the mind

of kings, presidents and seers

 

Forewarned

Angela sat, still and silent, arms to her side and legs placed firmly on the ground.  The musky odor of the dank room filled her nostrils as she took a deep breath and slowly exhaled. Her long blonde hair, secured in a ponytail, cascaded down the back of the worn Adirondack chair, her green eyes shut tight as she allowed the music to enter her mind.  Such a wondrous sound encased her very being, caressing her body and embracing her soul. She was lost in a world of awe and inspiration, an existence of pure beauty and exquisite motion and wonderment of the moment.

Angela bolted upright, her euphoria interrupted, arms tense, firmly grasping the sides of the chair. A pestiferous, Mephistophelian darkness had shown its face.  An offensive, revolting and repulsive melody filled her ears. She blinked her eyes once, then again in an attempt to rid herself of the evil that had disturbed her peace and tranquility.  She shuttered, body trembling in apprehension, for what she knew was to occur…to her… to friends… to family and perhaps ultimately, to humanity.

Angela realized California would prove to be the greatest challenge of her life.

 

 

 

9 comments

  1. Parisianne Modert says:

    The “Acceptance” of the California dream has captured many a reflection across the globe beginning with the Spanish explorations continuing as I critique Monica Brinkman’s prologue. Before I comment further let me express my gratitude for the relaxed format radio interview with our editor and chief of puns.

    Putting aside that Mr. Sully no longer lives in or Ms. Brinkman broadcast to my knowledge from California, there is an element about “Acceptance” which is very relatable, therefore having a true and vivid voice. The spirit of humans seeking new adventures is as old as humankind, but there also is the price of leaving people behind to commit to such a quest. “California Dreamin’ on such a winter’s day.” was a perfect fit for this prologue as the adventure of a young woman’s lifetime begins.

  2. Michael Stang says:

    There is so much to look forward to, how could I not be peaked. Being a sequel I assume most of this is written?
    Thank you for introducing me to the word mephistophelian. Another time, when I have a few months, I will do the research. In a drive-bye I’m thinking Greek.

    This contest would no be the same without you’re talented hat in the ring.

  3. Parisianne Modert says:

    Dear Michael,

    Mephistopheles sometimes called Mephisto is actually a German folklore demon that was made very famous in the silent movie days as a kind of vampyre. There is a connection as well to Faust as a satanic worker and in Franz Liszt’s Mephisto Waltzes.

    I agree with you that the use of this language enriched both the prologue and this overall contest.

  4. Sheri Strobaugh says:

    Makes me a California Dreamer… I have never heard of the “M” word either. Makes me want to read more! Thank you Monica…

  5. There are so many parts to this… I wonder if she is some kind of mage… or demon hunter the likes of Japanese animated demigods. Now I wanna read the first book so I can “get the jokes” from the 1st book that are glanced at in the 2nd. A loverly read! And seriously, where may I find the first book?

  6. Firm entry, full of mysterious darkness tinging the background, hints of hellfire, smoke, and a haunted existence for a woman so sensitive that music can ring her bell.

    Sure, I’m in:)

    Fond regards,

    Shawna

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