Love Itself…Peggy Dobbs

                                                                     Anthony Quinn pontificates…or is that Derek Thomson from the other side of the pont, having just finished writing his novel The Covenant? (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/covenant-derek-thompson/1113841793) Literati (re)Build it, and they will come. Up and running again, our favorite writers are coming back to the playground.  Here is an entry into our contest Wingnuts by one of …

                                                                     Anthony Quinn pontificates…or is that Derek Thomson from the other side of the pont, having just finished writing his novel The Covenant? (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/covenant-derek-thompson/1113841793)

Literati

(re)Build it, and they will come.

Up and running again, our favorite writers are coming back to the playground.  Here is an entry into our contest Wingnuts by one of our favorite people on the planet, Peggy Dobbs.

I was certain her favorite writer was me…Alas, it’s Morris West.

Morris Langlo West AO (26 April 1916 – 9 October 1999) was an Australian novelist and playwright, best known for his novels The Devil’s Advocate (1959), The Shoes of the Fisherman (1963) and The Clowns of God (1981). His books were published in 27 languages and sold more than 60 million copies worldwide. Each new book he wrote after he became an established writer sold more than one million copies.[1]

West’s works were often focused on international politics and the role of the Roman Catholic Church in international affairs. One of his most famous works, The Shoes of the Fisherman (1963), described the election and career of a Slav as Pope, 15 years before the historic election of Karol Wojtyła as Pope John Paul II. The sequel, The Clowns of God, described a successor Pope, who resigned the papacy to live in seclusion, just as Pope Benedict XVI did in 2013.

Here is Peggy Dobbs entry. Welcome back!

LOVE  ITSELF

                “Just because I left the priesthood before taking my final vows doesn’t mean that you should.”

Miserable with uncertainty, I stared at Morris West with awe. I wasn’t a drinker but I picked up the glass he shoved into my hand and hesitated before downing what he assured me would calm my nerves as we waited on his, “Mate”, from seminary.

Reaching out my hand in supplication, I begged, “ Stay! How am I going to recognize him if you  go before he gets here?”

Leaning closer, Morris teased. “He will be dressed like a priest.  Listen… when I left seminary, he remained. ‘It was his profession to prepare other men for death, it shocked him to be so unready for his own.’ What I failed to tell you is that this advocate is dying but he is amazingly at peace with God, spending what time he has left helping confused seekers like yourself.”

Speechless, I watched Morris drain his glass and with a sailor’s jaunty salute he headed for the door. “That publisher in Rome want wait forever, my friend”, and he was gone.

Unaware, I mumbled aloud, “If this ‘Mate’ doesn’t show up, I suppose I’ll just have to wing it.”   Searching the raucous bar for a sober face, suddenly a warm hand touched my shoulder.

Looking up into a gaunt face with a smile created by Love itself, he said, “I think I am the Wingman you are looking for.”

12 comments

  1. Glclark says:

    Holy Smoke – I got CHILLS! Peggy Dobbs you have roared back into the AWwYP world in that spiritual way that we’ve been missing for a very long time. Thank God you are here with us. You are that shining light that has been missing and now, with your return, we can find our way.
    God Bless you and we’ve missed you.

    • 1948pdobbs says:

      Gary, Gary, Gary, what a wonderful welcome back. I’ve tried to do some writing before now but my heart just wasn’t in it. This contest gave me an opportunity to remind those who like to get lost in a novel what a great writer Morris West was. Before my husband died, he had read the Introduction to West’s autobiography,”From The Ridge”. He said that was exactly how he felt as he was growing older. He tried to share it with every man he knew over fifty. Thanks again for making me feel like one of the kids on the playground.
      Blessings, pd

  2. KYLE Katz says:

    I certainly enjoyed this Peggy. Thanks for the reminder. Faith and love itself is all one really needs. Love your writing.

    • 1948pdobbs says:

      You left one out Kyle, “Faith, Hope and Love, but the greatest is”…well,we all know what the greatest is. Thank you so much for your kind words. I also appreciate you backing up Thorn with your recommendation of Leonard Cohen’s album, “Old Ideas”. I listened to his songs on Youtube until 2 am this morning. When I got to “Dance Me To The End of Love”, too many memories came rushing in along with the tears. I brilliantly decided it was past my bed time. I’ve been hunting the album all morning via the phone. Blessings, pd

      • KYLE Katz says:

        Peggy, I got mine on itunes. Dance Me To The End of Love, is one of my favorites. I post that one on my Facebook way to often and have actually gotten new friends to respond because of that one song. We just have to keep dancing, Peggy. And Yes HoPe.

  3. Diane Cresswell says:

    Oh Miss Peggy I have missed your writing so much. Superb as usual – not missing a beat to bring us to those emotions of memory. I think it was brilliant to add Leonard Cohen at the end…just like a final kiss – its bring deeper depth to the story. Thank you for returning with your insight, touching writing along with love and faith. I too love Leonard – his words and songs really strike the cords deep within.

    • 1948pdobbs says:

      So good to hear from you Diane, and all the familiar names and faces as well! I can’t take credit for adding the song. Our beloved Editor-in-chief did that. Hallelujha, was the only Cohen song I was familiar with. At first I thought I had gotten “Thorned” but decided it was a big “hug”, instead. I appreciate your kind comments. Blessings, pd

  4. I really cannot say what I feel about reading your talented writing, again, on the site. As much to say that I have missed you, and I love you as everybody else in the crowded room feels the same.

    My mom MADE me read “Shoes” when I was a senoir in high school. I did not get it being JR Tolkien was more my taste. She quizzed me, “Well, what did you think?” “Yeah, yeah, mom, it was great.” “You didn’t get that they were brothers, did you?” “Of course I did…what?” “Read it again.”

    So, it is not one of my favorties. I have my mom to thank. I so admire you for taking this on. This is great.

    • 1948pdobbs says:

      Mike,
      Disqus is doing that thing to me again!
      Thank you for the kind welcome. “Shoes” isn’t my favorite book but Morris West makes you think long after you have finished his books and I think I have the all. The quote is the first line from “The Devil’s Advocate”. I thought we were suppose to leave hints about the author and I completely over looked the Wingman being the author. Thorn chose “Shoes” and the song which is really beautiful.
      Blessings, pd

    • 1948pdobbs says:

      I hope to be around for a while, and this is one of my favorite pass times. Thank you Sheri. pd

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