Love lift us up where we belong

Most mothers ending up winging it through parenthood. But Tisha Deutsch is talonted and did not have to acquire her skills on the fly.

Literati! Tisha Deutsch is one of my favorite people, though, as is the case with most of you, we have only met in the playground that is A Word with You Press. And why is she so special?  Because Tisha has the absolutely perfect excuse not to write:  she is raising about seven adopted kids. …

Literati!

Tisha Deutsch is one of my favorite people, though, as is the case with most of you, we have only met in the playground that is A Word with You Press.

And why is she so special?  Because Tisha has the absolutely perfect excuse not to write:  she is raising about seven adopted kids. (Tish, I do hope in the comment box you will give folks a link to your FB or website)

And Yet, Tisha has found time to write something for our contest, and I darned good entry at that.  Welcome back my dear!  Glad we’re all getting reunited!

Most mothers ending up winging it through parenthood. But Tisha Deutsch is talonted and did not have to acquire her skills on the fly.

Here is her entry into our contest You Didn’t Write That

Writing to Hold On

by

Tisha Deutsch

 

It wasn’t their fault.

They couldn’t see her. Not for who she was. Not in a way that was real.

So they tread upon her life, marking out territory.

Tearing into the hallowed places, staking claim while passing through, they invaded,

consumed, expected. Devouring her every thought, her ambition, her vision.

What once belonged to someone else, to a woman as full and vivid as each of them,

became most exclusively theirs.

Spending her like currency, they took what they required.

Thriving, gaining ground, eager to soar, they grew.

Fading, she diminished in their wake.

They couldn’t be blamed. It was their nature.

Thick with oblivion, what they failed to realize were the hidden pieces of her, buried

underneath the barrage of demands, still lingering beneath the surface,

begging to be recalled.

Painfully aware they could slip through her fingers with each passing year, she clung

to those pieces, desperate to hold on to the person she once knew.  Herself.

The words flooded her mind. The tears wet her keyboard.

When she typed, she remembered. So she wrote.

“You didn’t write that, did you?”

Flushed, she replied, “yes, I did.”

“It’s really good, mom.”

“Thank you, baby.”

 

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Thanks for this Tisha, and by all means post it on your facebook, and invite your friends to leave comments on our site.

Maybe even enter the contest themselves?

 

23 comments

  1. Mac Eagan says:

    There are two things in life I find equally amazing.
         Parents becoming aware of their children as unique individuals.
         Children learning the same thing about their parents.
    Great work, Tisha.

      • Mac Eagan says:

        I think she is starting to.
        I do believe children grow into an awareness of their parents’ individuality, as this is also a part of them becoming more aware of themselves, whereas parents are more likely to have an A-HA moment when they finally grasp the changes that have been taking place for years.

  2. Tisha, so good to read your personal talents again.  From the towers of mother you have created an insight shared by all those who have watched their children grow and thrive, and take, like they took from the mother’s breasts.  The understanding to justify is a maternal grace.  Thank you for sharing this sensitivity.

  3. Diane Cresswell says:

    This is so richly done and executed…awareness at its best.  You have captured something that few can see or even realize.  You are an exceptional person – a higher soul who sees and knows…thank you.  Absolutely beautiful.

  4. Debi Swim says:

    I sent this as a private post to my two girls. One has two boys and the other four boys and they love being moms but this piece will resonate with them (and all mom I would imagine) because it is so easy to ‘lose’ ourselves in the people we love. I still struggle with that. I’m 61 years old and wonder what I’ll be when I grow up. Who in the world am I. Do I have anything to say, to be? I guess that is why my poetry and the little bit of writing I attempt is so important to me. Thank you so very much for this beautiful, touching piece of life.

    • Mac Eagan says:

      Don’t worry, Debi.  We all wonder what Thorn will be when he grows up, too.  What you are basically telling us is that you will fit in here right nicely.

  5. Tisha Deutsch says:

    All wrapped up in my children’s busyness I failed to see you had posted this until just now!! Haha, how appropriate, right? Thank you so much for all your kind words and for the chance to bare my soul. 🙂 It means such a lot to me. And Thornton, the feeling is completely mutual!

  6. Erin says:

    A great continuation of Tisha’s blog…real, heartfelt, and somehow my thoughts captured in words that I can’t find myself.

  7. EM says:

    Our privilege to die to serve, just as our saviour became nothing to give us abundant life. Yet what a gruelling grind, this wearing away of ourselves at the hands of those we love most. Suffocating, surreal, sublime.

  8. Courtney says:

    tisha, your writing always blesses me…and challenges me…and forces me to admit feelings i try to push down. thank you!

  9. Miryam says:

    …that exhale when you have exposed your life to your children, and discover they have grown up…   Beautiful piece Tisha.

  10. Chalice Divine says:

    Oh brave and devoted rescuer of lost children.I salute you, I am humbled by your sacrifices, and I celebrate your tenacity and loving resolve. Sweet warm night winds brush you with velvet wings of peace and the new light of morning refill the deep cistern of your courageous and generous soul. Simply ringing this moment in my heart, and probably will keep tolling forever in the depths of my own soul. You have touched my deepest heart and i will feel like being a better human being simply becuase you tore this from your heart and showed it in all its fragile strength.

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